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East Bering Sea LME Maintained by NOAA  
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Introduction
 
The East Bering Sea Large Marine Ecosystem is bounded by the Bering Strait on the north, by the Alaskan Peninsula and Aleutian island chain on the south, and by the Alaskan coast on the east. The LME is characterized by a wide shelf and by a seasonal ice cover that reaches its maximum extent of 80% coverage in March, with a Sub-Arctic climate. This is an LME characterized by an extreme environment at high latitude, in which temperature, currents and seasonal oscillations influence the productivity. Map. Note that the statistics of many US agencies tend to apply to all of Alaska, which makes a specific statistical breakdown for the East Bering Sea Large Marine Ecosystem difficult to obtain.
 
Productivity
 
Satellite image of Bering Sea
Photo title: Satellite image of Bering Sea
Photo credit: NASA. GL-2002-002417
Coccolithophorids in the Bering Sea. This clear SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) image shows the bright blooms of coccolithophores in the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska.
 
Pollution and Ecosystem Health
 
The Bering Sea has low levels of toxic contaminants, but these have been rising over the last 50 years due to increased human activities (mining, fishing, and oil exploration). This increase is linked to the long-range transport of contaminants through the ocean and atmosphere from other regions. Cold region ecosystems such as the Bering Sea are more sensitive to the threat of contaminants than warmer regions because the loss and breakdown of these contaminants are delayed in colder areas. Also, animals high in the food web with relatively large amounts of fat tend to have high concentrations of organic contaminants such as pesticides and PCBs. This causes concerns about human health in the region, particularly for Alaska natives (for instance, the Aleut community) who rely on marine mammals and seabirds as food sources and may show levels of POPs in tissue and breast milk significantly higher than those found in more southerly populations. More.
 
 
 
 
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News
Websites
A Near-Realtime Arctic Change Indicator Website Arctic Change A Near-Realtime Arctic Change Indicator Website 
Protecting the living environment of the Pacific Rim - free newsletter Pacific Environment Protecting the living environment of the Pacific Rim - free newsletter 
The programme for the Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment is one of the five programmes of the Arctic Council. Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment The programme for the Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment is one of the...  
Books
International perspective on the status and trends of marine ecosystems in the North Pacific Marine Ecosystems of the North Pacific International perspective on the status and trends of marine ecosystems in the ...  
Institutional Contact
The Pacific Oceanological Institute (POI) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Science. Pacific Oceanological Institute The Pacific Oceanological Institute (POI) of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russ...  
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